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The Surprising Health Benefits of Stair Climbing

In All Health Watch, Anti-Aging, Diet and Nutrition, Featured Article, Fitness and Exercise, General Health by INH Research1 Comment

When we go to the gym, we face a choice… Should we do an aerobic workout? Or strength exercises? Maybe a little of both?

Studies show they each have important and specific health benefits. Aerobic exercise is good for your heart and lungs. It lowers blood pressure, improves immunity and blood lipids, and it promotes vascular health.1

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Yes, You Can Be Fat and Fit

In All Health Watch, Anti-Aging, Diet and Nutrition, Featured Article, Fitness and Exercise by INH Research0 Comments

For decades, doctors have debated whether people can be overweight and still be healthy.

If you get plenty of exercise but are still heavy, does that mean you’re in bad shape?

A new study attempted to find an answer. York University researchers gathered 853 adults who had weight issues. All were attending weight management clinics in Ontario, Canada.1

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Wine Goes to Your Head…and That’s a Good Thing

In All Health Watch, Alzheimer's and Memory, Anti-Aging, Cognitive Health, Dementia, Diet and Nutrition, Featured Article by INH Research0 Comments

Research on alcohol and health has been all over the place.

Some studies have shown moderate drinking is beneficial for heart health and longevity… Others show that even small amounts of alcohol might increase cancer risk.1

But a new study provides strong evidence that a couple glasses of wine a day help your brain. It shows that moderate amounts of alcohol help your brain remove dementia-causing waste products.

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Researchers Discover the Best Workout for Your Heart

In All Health Watch, Anti-Aging, Diet and Nutrition, Featured Article, Heart and Cardiovascular by INH Research3 Comments

We’ve been recommending high-intensity interval training (HIIT) for years… Now, a major new study shows it can reverse a leading cause of heart failure.

University of Texas scientists recruited 53 people ages 45-64. None of them had ever exercised regularly. And their hearts showed it.

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