Is This Popular Tea Hiding a Deadly Secret?

It’s one of our all-time favorite drinks… But its popular extract may be doing more harm than good for your health if you’re not getting it from the right source.

It’s one of the most popular drinks on the planet. But its pleasant taste isn’t the only reason why. That’s because it is one of the easiest ways to support your overall health—and fight off the effects of aging.

Research shows that people who regularly drink it can reduce their risk of high blood pressure by as much as 65%.1 Its polyphenols deliver anticancer benefits in every cup.. It also helps protect your prostate. It’s even a great way to alleviate stress. But where you get it from might undo all of those benefits—or worse.

The Norwegian Food Safety Authority (NFSA) is warning consumers that too much of it can lead to liver problems. Apparently it’s even sending people to the hospital. But they’re not telling you the whole story.

Skipping this powerful natural substance may be a huge mistake. But getting it from the wrong source may be more than a waste of money: It could be putting your health at serious risk.

We’re talking about green tea. But the tea itself isn’t the problem… It’s the popular—and profitable—green tea extract causing a controversy.

The NFSA alleges high-dose green tea extract supplements are responsible for liver complications leading to hospitalizations. But there’s no direct proof. According to the NFSA:

“These reports come from doctors and hospitals . . .  we take them seriously. It is a part of our warning system we have in place . . . there are strong suspicions but at this stage there is no direct proof. The NFSA recommends consumers to be cautious using such products.”2

It’s a pretty vague warning…But we don’t fault them for looking out for the public’s health.

While it is very rare, some green tea extract supplements have caused liver problems.3 But you can put the blame squarely on poor quality products and unsafe “mega-doses.” Green tea supplements are extremely popular, but not all supplement makers have your optimal health in mind. That’s why it is so vital to buy products from reputable sources.

Luckily, there are simple ways to avoid getting into trouble in the first place.

The best way to dodge these problems is to drink organic green tea. You’re still getting the health benefits but in smaller doses—and from a natural source. And while you’re at it, give white tea a try. White tea may have even more antioxidant power than green tea.

Of course, you can still take a green tea extract if you want to. Just look for a high quality supplement with a reasonable dose. Remember, when it comes to extracts, look for ones that list their concentration on the label. That way you know exactly how much of the active ingredients you’re getting. And unless directed by a healthcare practitioner—don’t take more than the label recommends.

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Health Topic: Anti-Aging | Cancer | Diet and Nutrition | Longevity | Prostate Cancer


  1. Valerie S. says:

    Also, some of the tea from Japan may be contaminated. Republic of Tea sent me a report showing that their product is fine and has been tested. Have you researched this?

  2. Art says:

    Couldn’t you have provided a good baseline dosage or strength for a green tea extract? I expected you would have provided that since it goes directly to the health concern you’re addressing. But you didn’t. So I’m scratching my head in wonderment why. Perhaps you can update this article with this added information? That would be even more helpful.

  3. Edward says:

    What is a reasonable dose?

  4. Edward Neel says:

    My Green Tea choice is “Organic Matcha” which advertises 10 x’s more potent plus 137 x’s more EGCG’s than regular tea… The tea contains 1000 mg Organic Green Tea. My question is, is this tea safe?

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