This Ancient Aphrodisiac Can Lower Your Cholesterol

Artichokes cholesterol levels

It was prized by the ancient Greeks and Romans as a delicacy and aphrodisiac. But this funny-looking flower bud has a new niche these days…

It works like a statin to lower cholesterol levels. Italian researchers tested an extract of the plant on overweight people with high cholesterol. After eight weeks,1 the extract decreased their total cholesterol and “bad” LDL levels. Even more significant…it simultaneously increased their “good” HDL cholesterol levels.

A German study got even better results. Participants improved their cholesterol ratios after only six weeks. Their total cholesterol levels dropped 18.5 percent.2 Their LDL cholesterol decreased by 22.9 percent. Their LDL to HDL ratios decreased 20 percent.

Did you know? The artichoke is actually a flower that hasn’t bloomed. And you can make tea from it. Boil whole artichokes for 20 minutes. Then let them steep for another 20 minutes. Remove the artichokes from the pot. Pour the remaining liquid into a pitcher, add a little honey, and you have a liver-cleansing tonic. It keeps your hair, nails, and skin looking beautiful too.

And unlike statins, the extract had no adverse effects.

What’s the funny-looking—yet delicious—plant that can lower cholesterol in six weeks?

The artichoke.

We’ve told you before how dangerous statins are. We’ve warned you how they have been found to cause calcification.3 The very thing they are supposed to prevent.

Cynarin—the active phytonutrient in artichokes—is an effective natural statin. It lowers total cholesterol levels and balances HDL and LDL levels to a healthy ratio.

Like a statin, cynarin inhibits the liver’s ability to produce LDL—the “bad” cholesterol. It raises HDL—the “good” cholesterol. It allows proper blood flow without plaque buildup.

The leaf of the artichoke plant contains the highest concentration of cynarin. Eating the artichoke plant not only provides cynarin, it’s also high in fiber. And it helps maintain healthy digestion and liver function. One way to get all those benefits is by steaming the whole artichoke and eating the “meat” from the leaves.

But don’t be confused by the Jerusalem artichoke. That one is actually a root. So make sure you always pick globe artichokes. However, the leaf extract will give you the greatest benefit. You can find artichoke leaf extract at your local health food store.

Balancing your cholesterol ratios and lowering the overall number is vital to protecting your heart. High cholesterol is one of the leading culprits in stroke and heart disease. Artichoke will keep your cholesterol levels healthy. And it may just keep heart disease at bay.

Like this Article? Forward this article here or Share on Facebook.


Related Articles:

Health Topic: Cholesterol | Diet and Nutrition | Heart and Cardiovascular


  1. Ben T says:

    Everyone can talk about HDL and LDL. You really have to know what these numbers are about, and your total risk. Knowing just your total cholesterol may not be enough. You need to factor in your triglycerides and use the right chart:

  2. Broderick Lawhon says:

    Cholesterol isn’t all bad. It’s an essential fat that provides support in the membranes of our bodies’ cells. Some cholesterol comes from diet and some is made by the liver. Cholesterol can’t dissolve in blood, so transport proteins carry it where it needs to go. These carriers are called lipoproteins, and LDL (low-density lipoprotein) is one member of the lipoprotein family.^.^;

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *